Therapy for Womxn

“There is no place so awake and alive as the edge of becoming. But more than that, birthing the kind of woman who can authentically say, “My soul is my own,” and then embody it in her life, her spirituality and her community is worth the risk and hardship.” -Sue Monk Kidd, The Dance of the Dissident Daughter

Often, womxn become dissociated from their bodies and their voices (two processes that go hand-in-hand), and find that they are often looking outside, or to others, for guidance and instructions as to what to do and how to be in life. Often, this results in a pervasive sadness, a feeling of being strangely listless or unfulfilled, and a feeling of unreality about oneself and one’s environment. Whatever you perceive ‘The Feminine’ to be, it is not honored in the culture, and this funnels right down into our own experience of ourselves, our worth, and our gifts.

I love helping womxn reclaim what Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estes calls their “wildish” nature, and the deep wisdom of their bodies. I bring a depth approach to my work with womxn, as I find that dream analysis and reconnecting with Soul, in whatever form that takes, is often what is needed for womxn to come back into their power, individuality, wisdom and giftedness. I love helping womxn get out of being stuck in their throats, and come into a place of being able to speak from what writer Lucy H. Pearce calls “the Deep Feminine”. You could also call this the voice of Soul, but whatever it is, we as a species and as a planet are dying for this voice. In the words of writer Meggan Watterson, “My prayer is that every woman and girl can hear that voice of truth inside her and know that it is the greatest spiritual authority in her life.” Traditional depth approaches often lack an awareness of the more feminine, embodied aspects of psyche, and of the feminine psyche in general. I am passionate about this, and love working with womxn who are going through their own Feminine Mysteries Initiation, in whatever form that takes, even if it is just coming up initially as a depression, a pervasive anxiety, or an overwhelming sense of disconnect.

Photo by Elle Hughes

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